Dirty Football - looking beyond a single frame / by Steven Johnson

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This past weekend, I shot the Florida Gators playing Georgia Southern in Gainesville, Fla. It was supposed to be the usual FBS blowout game for a big division one program. Instead, it turned into one of the most embarrassing losses in Gator Football history.

By the looks of the photographs, the Gators were not too happy they were losing to what was intended to be an easy win.

I tweeted a single photo of a Florida defensive back, Marcus Maye, in what looks like an intentional gouging of a Georgia Southern player's eyes.

Now, it is not fair to say this was an intentional act. That is for readers to decide, but the role of a sideline photographer is to tell the story of the game, and, in this case, bring the viewers content that they might not see on television.

Georgia Southern fullback, William Banks, was not happy with the officials after no foul play was called.

Georgia Southern fullback, William Banks, was not happy with the officials after no foul play was called.

Now, gouging can be both intentional and unintentional in football - especially when a helmet is removed during a play.

After going back to do another edit, I noted that the player, Maye, was getting up, looked around and then went back down and put his hands on the face of the Georgia Southern player.

The Georgia Southern player, William Banks, was not happy with the result of the play and brought it to the attention of an official.

No foul play was called.

This is a prime example of how speculation from just one photo can be further explained in a series of pictures and how a single picture can often mislead.

As always, it is our job to document the event, but we often think of single pictures to describe an incident or play. In this case, it took three (and there are more, but they get redundant) to tell the story.

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